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A New Visual Journalism

It seems about time to acknowledge that “photojournalism” is a twentieth-century term that is merging into,  due in large part to the Web, a more expansive twenty-first century “visual journalism.” Video, sound, text, interviews, panoramics, cellphones, sequential editing as well as still photographs are all part of the messy, emerging field of visual journalism.

What is missing in visual journalism so far is the ability to create interactive, non-linear narratives using visuals (hypertext/hypermedia), a strategy that few have mastered (and is hardly ever taught) but increasingly will be required. After all, the Web is not simply an amalgam of television and print but a new environment that will allow, and require, much more innovation. One might say that we are now at the dawn of visual journalism, much like the Daguerreotypists were at the dawn of photography–except that for the most part we seem to be enjoying the challenges less.

3 Comments

  1. Nice start, but I would have liked a longer article on this subject. I am particularly interested in the ‘non-linear’ and ‘interactive’ elements mentioned. From a social activism point of view we are moving away from the standard template (photojournalist goes to scene of concern, produces images, NGO/media publish them, people give money/take action) towards a ‘digital democratisation’ of image production through cheap cameras. Where these images are part of a conversation between people, not only at the site of concern but around the world. Where images of demonstrations in, for example Iran, link with solidarity actions in Europe. These are presented on a platform - the web, and mainly interactive social networking sites - where the ‘audience’ is also likely to be a ‘contributer’.

    More on this please!

    Monday, July 27, 2009 at 8:35 am | Permalink
  2. fredritchin wrote:

    More coming…

    Monday, July 27, 2009 at 6:45 pm | Permalink
  3. More on this indeed please.

    I am part of a small team devising and delivering a new Degree course with Photography as the loose title, but at its heart is the notion of a sustainable working practice. Perceiving and understanding emerging practices and necessary business models is our primary tenet. “After Photography” will be amongst our required reading this year. Thank you.

    Thursday, August 13, 2009 at 8:57 am | Permalink

5 Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. [...] After Photography › A New Visual Journalism http://www.pixelpress.org/afterphotography/?p=794 – view page – cached It seems about time to acknowledge that “photojournalism” is a twentieth-century term that is merging into, due in large part to the Web, a more expansive twenty-first century “visual journalism.” Video, sound, text, interviews, panoramics, cellphones, sequential editing as well as still photographs are all part of the messy, emerging field of visual — From the page [...]

  2. [...] It is about rethinking the capacity to tell stories in line with what Fred Ritchin calls a “new visual journalism,” which he outlined in greater detail [...]

  3. Twitted by CU_Photography on Saturday, September 26, 2009 at 8:27 am

    [...] This post was Twitted by CU_Photography [...]

  4. Bildiğimiz Fotoğrafın Sonu... | UTKU KAYNAR on Wednesday, October 7, 2009 at 3:14 am

    [...] fotoğraf editörü Fred Ritchin,  “Yeni bir Görsel Gazetecilik” başlıklı yazısında, foto-gazeteciliğin daha geniş bir konsepte evrim geçirdiğini [...]

  5. [...] Est ce que les photojournalistes ou les rédacteurs ayant appris la maitrise des outils d’images convergent-ils vers un nouveau métier, celui de « journaliste visuel » ? Nous ne sommes plus uniquement photographe, nous avons une expertise sur l’image et de multiples compétences transversales. Le blog anglophone, au titre évocateur, After Photography pense que « nous sommes maintenant à l’aube du journalisme visuel, tout comme les utilisateurs du daguerréotype étaient à l’aube de la photographie, sauf que la plupart d’entre nous n’est pas en mesure d’en apprécier les défis ».8 [...]

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